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Your struggle is part of your story.
TheDailyPositive.com (via thedailypozitive)
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When you talk, you are repeating what you already know. But if you listen, you may learn something new.
TheDailyPositive.com (via thedailypozitive)
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279 notes   -   Posted 39 minutes ago

unskinny:

Stop apologizing for the things you enjoy eating.

Stop apologizing for the things you enjoy wearing.

Stop apologizing for how you prefer to spend your day.

Stop apologizing for the things that make you happy.


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comealongmisspond:

vajoochie:

how do boys look good without makeup

Because society hasn’t told boys they look bad without it


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hiccstrid:

thestarkidshavethephonebox:

kristoffbjorgman:

buzzinglikethebusybee:

modestlyhomo:

anniephantom:

no-one-sees:


I love you most.

She kisses her hair instead of her forehead.

oh my god that’s
that’s just
so subtly terrifying 

THAT JUST BLEW MY MIND SO HARD 

WHOAAAAAAA

This is actually a recurring theme throughout the entirety of Tangled - whenever Gothel is being affectionate to Rapunzel she’s directly focusing her affection to Rapunzel’s power - whether it be singing to the hair, kissing the hair or Gothel’s pet name for Rapunzel literally being “my flower”.
It’s one of those subtle things that once you notice becomes glaringly obvious and it’s why it’s difficult to take the “Gothel really loved Rapunzel!” apologists seriously.

And whenever Eugene is being more affectionate towards Rapunzel, he tends to to push her hair away from her face so as to see her face better.

i love this movieeee

hiccstrid:

thestarkidshavethephonebox:

kristoffbjorgman:

buzzinglikethebusybee:

modestlyhomo:

anniephantom:

no-one-sees:

I love you most.

She kisses her hair instead of her forehead.

oh my god that’s

that’s just

so subtly terrifying 

THAT JUST BLEW MY MIND SO HARD 

WHOAAAAAAA

This is actually a recurring theme throughout the entirety of Tangled - whenever Gothel is being affectionate to Rapunzel she’s directly focusing her affection to Rapunzel’s power - whether it be singing to the hair, kissing the hair or Gothel’s pet name for Rapunzel literally being “my flower”.

It’s one of those subtle things that once you notice becomes glaringly obvious and it’s why it’s difficult to take the “Gothel really loved Rapunzel!” apologists seriously.

And whenever Eugene is being more affectionate towards Rapunzel, he tends to to push her hair away from her face so as to see her face better.

i love this movieeee

(Source: disneytangles)

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pixiewaffles:

vegan-queer:

Down Is Not Up (2012) based on the Pink Tank’s fierce anti-assimilationist pamphlet We Will Not Protect You. 


I want to plaster Columbus with this.

pixiewaffles:

vegan-queer:

Down Is Not Up (2012) based on the Pink Tank’s fierce anti-assimilationist pamphlet We Will Not Protect You.

I want to plaster Columbus with this.

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(Source: davidroads)

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  1. What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?
  2. What if I fail — how will I recover?
  3. What if I do nothing?
  4. What if I succeed?
  5. What’s truly worth doing, whether you fail or succeed?
  6. In this failure, what went right?

Jonathan Fields, author of Uncertainty: Turning Fear and Doubt into Fuel for Brilliance and creator of the magnificent Good Life Project, proposes six questions that help overcome the fear of failure. Pair with Fields on how to make your own luck, then see this invaluable read on creativity and the gift of failure.

(via 99U)

(Source: explore-blog)

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I wouldn’t mind, but splitting children’s books strictly along gender lines is not even good publishing. Just like other successful children’s books, The Hunger Games was not aimed at girls or boys; like JK Rowling, Roald Dahl, Robert Muchamore and others, Collins just wrote great stories, and readers bought them in their millions. Now, Dahl’s Matilda is published with a pink cover, and I have heard one bookseller report seeing a mother snatching a copy from her small son’s hands saying “That’s for girls” as she replaced it on the shelf.

You see, it is not just girls’ ambitions that are being frustrated by the limiting effects of “books for girls”, in which girls’ roles are all passive, domestic and in front of a mirror. Rebecca Davies, who writes the children’s books blog at Independent.co.uk, tells me that she is equally sick of receiving “books which have been commissioned solely for the purpose of ‘getting boys reading’ [and which have] all-male characters and thin, action-based plots.” What we are doing by pigeon-holing children is badly letting them down. And books, above all things, should be available to any child who is interested in them.

Happily, as the literary editor of The Independent on Sunday, there is something that I can do about this. So I promise now that the newspaper and this website will not be reviewing any book which is explicitly aimed at just girls, or just boys. Nor will The Independent’s books section. And nor will the children’s books blog at Independent.co.uk. Any Girls’ Book of Boring Princesses that crosses my desk will go straight into the recycling pile along with every Great Big Book of Snot for Boys. If you are a publisher with enough faith in your new book that you think it will appeal to all children, we’ll be very happy to hear from you. But the next Harry Potter or Katniss Everdeen will not come in glittery pink covers. So we’d thank you not to send us such books at all.


Gender-specific books demean all our children. So the Independent on Sunday will no longer review anything marketed to exclude either sex - Comment - Voices - The Independent

AMAZE!

(via thebooksmith)

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